Should U.S. Congress Consider Resolution Labeling Ottoman Empire's Massacre of Armenians Genocide?

Posted by Frederick Jones
October 16, 2007
Map of Armenia

The United States Congress is considering a resolution that brands the Ottoman Empire's World War I massacre of Armenians a genocide. The tragedy occurred ninety-years ago. Currently, the United States and Turkey enjoy a close strategic relationship.

Should the U.S. Congress consider the resolution labeling the Ottoman Empire's World War I massacre of Armenians a genocide?

Comments

Comments

Gary R.
|
Florida, USA
October 19, 2007

Gary in Florida writes:

Does it matter? Just one more thing Congress gets involved in to stay away from the tough issues that need to be tackled! Open your mouth, insert foot, as the damage has been done for the most part now and we all are expecting Turkey to complicate the Iraq situation shortly. Members of Congress and their leaders need to think before they talk and act, not just "spew". We have our GI's stationed in Turkey, do you guys think of their health and welfare before you open your mouths on such subjects?? Anyone wonder why the ratings are the lowest in history on the performance of Congress??!! Forget about how you can make the news, anyone can do that these days; think about the repercussions of what you say and do. Thanks for the forum for us to have our opinions voiced.

Jim W.
|
California, USA
October 19, 2007

Jim in California writes:

No. If they must mess with this could they not wait until we are out of Iraq and the Mideast? We've muddied up the water too much already.

I suspect that most of them don't really care, anyway.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
October 20, 2007

Eric in New Mexico writes:

I agree Jim, but not because of our interests, or that of Congress, but because because folks in Turkey may not be quite ready to look at the past is why the Congress should not of acted in a way that forced them to look at it.

But hey, Jim, the waters were muddy long before we had reason to be there, and it's up to the people of the region to take responsibility for living with each other in peace, or not.

The US can encorage that in multiple ways, both from a soft power perspective as well as hard, in terms of dealing with cross border terrorist activity that Turkey has a fair right to be concerned with, as a separate issue.

As for long term breakdown of bilateral relations, expression of anger in recalling an ambassador etc, I see this as being temporary in nature because there is far more positive aspects to their US/NATO relationship than the Turkish gov. is perhaps willing to admit at the moment.

All in all I think the bill lacked vision, and an appreciation of the effects generated.

Hopefully the Turkish people will reconcile this issue among themselves, and something positive may result in the long term for the region.

David
|
Connecticut, USA
October 20, 2007

David in Connecticut writes:

The United States should recognize all genocide. It should become part of the history curriculum in all American textbooks. Somehow America has lost its moral fabric by bending to pressure groups from all corners of the earth. It is not how I was taught to appreciate my country growing up.

The egregious position of The State Department on this matter is beyond my comprehension. It makes me wonder just who is rewriting history? Did Einstein prove you can bend time?

Denise
|
Virginia, USA
October 20, 2007

Denise in Virginia writes:

No.

David
|
Connecticut, USA
October 20, 2007

David in Connecticut writes:

If we lose the war in Iraq, we should blame the Armenians. Of course I'll leave that to the historians.

David
|
Connecticut, USA
October 20, 2007

David in Connecticut writes:

It's truly amazing that the greatest country on this planet can't bring itself to say the 'G' word to the almost complete extermination of a race in the history of the world.

Javad
|
Iran
October 21, 2007

Javad in Iran writes:

This is a very difficult decision to make. But I think the true history of event should be reported.

Russell
|
South Carolina, USA
October 22, 2007

Russell in South Carolina writes:

This is a very convoluted topic to speak on but as it stands I'd have to say no. I reach this conclusion on the following grounds. The United States has no right, legal or moral, to police the histories of other countries. I think the phrase "History is written by the conquerors, not the conquered" is cliche yet appropriate. The United States has it's own skeletons in the closet, just as all countries do. The United States, in it's infancy, did things that would be considered inhumane by today's standards. The key term is "today's" standards. If other countries around the world were to return the favor I fear that we would have to shine in an unflattering light. The Native Americans were systematically erradicated while having their land take fom under their feet. The Africans from West Africa were taken from their land to be the victims of institutionalized slavery for financial gains that helped put the United States on the map as an international power. There is also the Salem Witch trials in which hundreds of people, mainly women, were killed just on the accusation of being a practitioner of dark arts. I could go on but I won't.

Turkey is no different than any other country. It is not a perfect country but neither are any of the other countries of the world. Look at the histories of England, France, Spain, Italy, and Greece just to name a few. No country has the power to undo what has already been done or unsay what has already been said. I wouldn't dare to attempt assigning blame for who caused or did what because it would be an exercise in futility. Particularly, when things are done in war how does one decide who is right or who is wrong? War, by it's very nature is violent and chaotic. It is the resolution of war that we can all benefit from.

The bottom line is that our Congress should be more concerned with issues that truly matter. Some of these issues are the failing public school systems, social security reform, and alternative fuel sources just to name a few. I am proud to be an American and I am thankful to live in the United States. However, I think our elected officials should stick to the issues for which they were elected to address.

John
|
Texas, USA
October 22, 2007

John in Texas writes:

@ Russell in South Carolina -- I agree with Russell in South Carolina.

Why in the world is our Congress even considering such a resolution? History is history - let it be. Learn from the past, over which we have no control and cannot change with resolutions, and try not to let it happen in the future.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
October 23, 2007

Eric in New Mexico writes:

As Mark Twain put it, "History never repeats itself, but sometimes it rhymes."

Hopefully nations will forge their futures with the lessons of history in hand. Our path to democracy may serve so others need not make the same mistakes on their own unique paths forward.

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