Welcome to Dipnote

Posted by Sean McCormack
September 25, 2007
Sean McCormack During Morning Press Gaggle

Welcome to the State Department's first-ever blog, Dipnote. As a communicator for the Department, I have the opportunity to do my fair share of talking on a daily basis. With the launch of Dipnote, we are hoping to start a dialogue with the public. More than ever, world events affect our daily lives--what we see and hear, what we do, and how we work. I hope Dipnote will provide you with a window into the work of the people responsible for our foreign policy, and will give you a chance to be active participants in a community focused on some of the great issues of our world today.

With Dipnote we are going to take you behind the scenes at the State Department and bring you closer to the personalities of the Department. We are going to try and break through some of the jargon and talk about how we operate around the world.

We invite you to participate in this community, and I am looking forward to stepping away from my podium every now and then into the blogosphere. Let the conversation begin.

PS - We're new at this. It looks like we broke our own rule and used State jargon in our blog title. "Dipnote" refers to a diplomatic note. It is one of the many ways in which governments formally communicate with each other.

The dictionary definition of a diplomatic note is: "A formal communication between an ambassador and a minister (usually the foreign minister) of this host government or another ambassador."

Comments

Comments

Sue
|
United Kingdom
September 27, 2007

Sue in U.K. writes:
Judge Europe to be an important part of current world affairs. Europe is the poilitical steady ship in the world and the U.S. needs to engage more with the U.K. and Europe after Blair's passionate support of the U.S. govenment.

Dan
|
United Kingdom
September 27, 2007

Dan in U.K. writes:
I think you need to rename your single entry template to 'entries' :)

kat-missouri
|
Missouri, USA
October 1, 2007

Kat in Missouri writes:
Great idea. Wondered when some of the federal agencies would get around to it. Hoping to see other nationals posting thoughts for a great communications device between government and people.

Hopefully, you will also open the blog up to state department employees with relations to other nations and our efforts there.

One thought though, "Dipnote". I think you need to re-think that. In terms of "branding" it definitely has bad connotations. I realize you were looking for something short and catchy, but that is either too funny or too oblivious to your own public image.

I don't want to criticize without making a suggestion, but I can't think of an appropriate name right now. Think about it.

Algum
|
Brazil
September 27, 2007

Algum in Brazil writes:
Well... Let's see what America has to say about the 'third world' countries and OUR resources...

Chang
|
China
September 28, 2007

Chang in China writes:
I like the way you choose to share oppinions with people from everywhere. Hope the voice you hear here can help to make a more peaceful and more beautiful would.

judith
|
Australia
September 28, 2007

Judith in Austrailia writes:
Ah, the comic section of the Internet.

jerome
|
China
September 28, 2007

Jerome in China writes:
Hope to see some articles about China, let us know your views on our country, because we are now seeing news filter. Unable to see the actual.

Jeton
|
Kosovo
September 28, 2007

Jeton in Kosovo writes:
I want to comment on Iranian presidents speech to the Columbia university. I would apeal on students not to take what he says for true, because one "value" of dictators is that they lie, they lie big. During the Milosevic time, whenever he said "Peace has no alternative" that meant something ugly was going to happen such us killing of civilians, another war or something...cheers.

Peter M.
|
Australia
September 28, 2007

Peter in Austrailia writes:
As Australia and the U.S.A. are such close friends it would be nice if you could keep us up to date in regards to any news concerning downunder.

Andre
|
Brazil
September 28, 2007

Andre in Brazil writes:
Very nice idea from the State Department. Excellent blog!

Keep up the good work!

David-hk
|
China
September 28, 2007

David in Hong Kong writes:
Please take action to stop the Myanmar Junta tyrannizing innocent citizens in Yangon. Being the so called 'international police', please fulfill your responsibility. It is RIDICULOUS to fight only if there is oil!!

David
|
Connecticut, USA
September 28, 2007

David in Connecticut writes:
How can there be such a thing? The State Department has never been known to tell a story straight. It's manipulated by politicians and special interest groups. It's the government's version of "Howdy Doody".

Norma
September 28, 2007

Norma writes:
Welcome to blogging. I have 11; you'll get the hang of it. I'll mention this at my blog.

kelven
|
China
September 28, 2007

Kelven in China writes:
is that true?hope chinese gov do the same so....learn more ,get more

Andrew
|
Pennsylvania, USA
September 28, 2007

Andrew in Pennsylvania writes:
Let's hope that we can engage in a real dialogue, and not just re-hashed press releases. To be honest, your initial comments on the Blackwater incident are not particuarly forthcoming or current - there is far more info available from the Wash Post, NYTimes, or that great new milblog site, www.uscavonpoint.com.

Kevin
|
California, USA
September 28, 2007

Kevin in California writes:
Sir: Before beginning I would like to say I am an Army Officer with time spent in Iraq and Afghanistan. I believe in our efforts in both locations. Having said that I believe the solution in both countries requiers more than military intervention. The DoS [U.S. Department of State] is undermanned, ill equipped and not designed to provide support on the political front where it is so very needed. Is there any movement to help reform or restructure the DoS to better provide support to help fledgling democracies and provide the political assistance to governments during reconstruction or construction of governments? I have been a part of several exercises that the DoS has sent members to in an effort to assist military efforts, but they are the same people and have no training or experience in working with the military or how it works or where they fit. Efforts like the Advanced Civilian Teams are steps in the right direction but they need resources, people and training behind them in order to be successful. I would appreciate a reply to these questions with whatever you can provide to demonstrate DoS is evolving and getting stronger in the right areas.

Respectfully,
Kevin

Tom
|
Pennsylvania, USA
September 28, 2007

Tom in Pennsylvania writes:
If you start another blog, you should use one of my favorite State Dept dip-speak terms: non-paper.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
September 28, 2007

Eric in New Mexico writes:
7.3 billion people in the world, someone out there has the right solutions, State has just tapped into the greatest think tank of all....

Now this is what I call Public Diplomacy....a public w/direct access to "the powers that be". As Kelven so rightly put it, "learn more, get more."

Well done folks, I look forward to many a good debate on the issues.

Mohammad
|
United Kingdom
September 28, 2007

Mohammad in U.K. writes:
I suggest that the State Department re-vamp its Iran policy. Currently the U.S. sees only two alternatives for Iran: living with a nuclear-armed Iran or taking military action against Tehran. Yet, the woman who leads the Iranian opposition has put forward a "Third Option": Supporting the Iranian people and their just Resistance movement to bring about democratic change in Iran. This is the kind of issue that the State Dept. should discuss on its new blog.

Tom
|
Tennessee, USA
September 28, 2007

Tom in Tennessee writes:
Congratulations on your new blog. I'm a college professor and I hope there will be stuff of interest for my students.

Cheryl
|
Pennsylvania, USA
September 29, 2007

Cheryl in Pennsylvania writes:
I hope that the DOS [U.S. Department of State] will rethink its position regarding Guatemalan adoptions and truly advocate for those U.S. citizens who have engaged in legal and ethical adoption procedures and (more importantly) have received referrals -- and are now being informed that their adoptions may not be completed. There are more than 5,000 Guatemalan babies and older children who have been relinquished by their birthparents and have been matched to U.S. families. My prospective daughter is one of these children. The DOS needs to do everything in its power to stop Guatemala from abruptly ending adoptions come Jan 1, 2008. Adoptions begun in good faith, now in the pipeline, need to be completed. Otherwise these children, with whom we have bonded, will be left in limbo -- or worse. What is DOS doing?

Joannes
|
Brazil
September 29, 2007

Joannes in Brazil writes:
To hear the persons is a thing completely different of to do what all they want that you (govern) do. Being the USA, everybody, around the world, they want to give ideas. But, in politic, ideas and action can live each one in your world. What will you do with all opinions? Thank you and sorry my terrible English!

SoldiersDad
|
District Of Columbia, USA
September 29, 2007

SD in Washington writes:
Sir: Always a good idea when Govt Agencies open themselves up to citizens "Petitioning Government"...seems that is in the Constitution Somewhere.

But the name DipNote has to go...the blogosphere can be quite cruel sometimes...you'll be referred to as Dip and another 4 letter word....how about something catchy like "DiplomacyNow" or "DiplomacyOnLine"

China N.
|
China
September 29, 2007

Netizen in China writes:
Congratulations to the world the United States Department of State to provide an understanding of your platform, and sincerely hope your platform Heiner inclusive, multi-cultural contacts.

Dou B.
|
China
September 30, 2007

Dou in Shanghai writes:
We all love u and this blog

Robert P.
|
Wisconsin, USA
September 30, 2007

Robert in Wisconsin writes:
We have to be careful that this is not just a place to blast U.S. foreign policy, as tempting as that might be. I agree with the idea that we should attempt positive suggestions in the area of policy.

It also might be noted that a number of teachers at various levels seek this to become an education opportunity for their students. That might be the way to help frame the context of this enterprise.

Munna
|
Louisiana, USA
September 30, 2007

Munna in Louisiana wriets:
Why is the U.S. not taking a more vocal stance against the ongoing blatant violations of human rights in Pakistan? General Pervez Musharraf is violently cracking down on lawyers and citizens peacefully protesting his unconstitutional rule and candidacy for elections. His regime is also suppressing press freedom through the use of brute force. Hundreds of people have been jailed; this is in addition to his arbitrary detention and release of political activists at whim. The US must pressure General Musharraf to immediately end this destruction of civil society in Pakistan. If we fail to do so, we risk becoming even more unpopular in a country that perceives Musharraf as an American puppet and vehemently hates him. Continuing U.S. support for Musharraf will jeopardize U.S. interests in the long run by speeding up the growth of religious extremism in that country.

Wang
|
China
September 30, 2007

Wang in China writes
This site opens a new and detailed window for me to know more about U.S. Department of State. I like it and I will keep on watching this to get more touch on what's going on there.

Tina
|
Louisiana, USA
September 30, 2007

Tina in Louisiana writes:
Thanks for opening up the doors to the State Department. I am excited about learning what goes on behind the scenes because I am interested in working for the State Department. I want to make a difference in the world while serving my country and this department is the place for me. Thanks again and I look forward to reading more.

Chris
|
Alabama, USA
September 30, 2007

Chris in Alabama writes:
I like the idea of this site and the opportunity that it provides to the public. I have a question that I know that public wants to know more about the should be kept up to date about each day. Right now there are 5000+ children in Guatemala that are referred to adoptive parents in America. The U.S. State Department and the Guatemala government are working toward the implementation of the Hague laws for international adoption. The problem is the Guatemala government is threatening to stop all in process adoptions such as my daughters. The State Department is I KNOW working to support our citizens and resolve this issue without delay. I believe that you need to open a question for these families such as mine to give us another opportunity to express our concerns so that you can tell us how you are fixing the situation.

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